U.S.A. Research

Fig 1:   In cooperation and a great partnership with AKRS John Deere we had at our fingertips a great tractor and 12 row 1tRIPr to use and demonstrate at the McNaught Farm

EIGHT ACTIVE SITES AS OF MAY 15th, 2021

FIRST AND FOREMOST THE ORTHMAN/McNAUGHT FARM RESEARCH ACTIVITIES

 

This year, we have 3 major sites where on going detailed field research efforts all in the Polk, Nebraska area.

Orthman with AKRS John Deere, Nutrien, North Forty Seed Co., QLF, SureFire Ag are back together with More Detailed Studies to Demonstrate the Orthman Strip Till System for the 2021 Crop Year

 

At the McNaught site we are demonstrating 30 inch row 1tRIPr technology with fertilizer placement in continuous corn
1. Accuracy of Fertilizer placement, below the seed in a designated ‘sweet’ spot at 6.5 inches
2. Comparison of dry fert blend applied in the fall vs. liquid fertility in the spring – these are side-by-side
3.  A sidedress study that will have of the nutrient load divided into percentage of the total of a 42 gpa load: Zero at ditching time, 25%, 50%, 75%, 100% and 125% duplicated
4. Joined with North Forty to have another 10 variety trial of relative maturity date differences of Q hybrids all planted at 33K, 8rows each
5.  32 rows each of a Pioneer 110 RMD variety looking at the time span of full germination with the seed being the standard mixing of seed sizes compared to the small sized seeds only.  Study will be 48 to 96 hrs in duration.
6.  A special compaction study with the use of a 8RX tractor compared to the MFWD 8R tractor before and after planting. 32 rows each
7.  A special duplicated starter study – similar to last year but in this comparison using 10-34-0 as a default blend compared to the Nutrien Riser blend with the QLF carbon product, a 100% Ortho starter blend with the QLF carbon product, and  no starter at all.  These are 8 row plots replicated 2X.
8.  Use of a MaxEmerge high speed planter compared to a ME5 Deere planter to evaluate seed spacing (singulation) – 32 rows each 2300ft length of run are the plots. MaxEmerge planter planted at 8-9mph.

For more information regarding details of studies, dates for field events, directions and viewings, please contact:  Pat McNaught, Territory Sales Rep or Justin Troudt, VP of Sales, Marketing and the Agronomy guys: Mike Petersen and Mick Goedeken, Agronomists

 

 

Spring Time at the Orthman Research Farm on the McNaught family farm:

The week of April 14 The Orthman crew joined hands with AKRS John Deere, SureFire Ag, Nutrien, North 40 Seeds to strip till the farm and lay down a blend of N-P-K-S-Zn fertility in the strips.  AKRS John Deere fully cooperated to furnish access to use a 12 row Orthman 1tRIPr with liquid fertility pumped via the 360tanks placed on special frames (see Fig 1 above).  The power plant was a 8R370 tractor.  This year we preset the 1tRIPr to slip in just a tad deeper than the 2020 season.  Everything did a great job.  We were applying 40 gpa of the nutrient solution mixed by Nutrien.  Remaining portion of the liquid products will be divided via cultivation and sidedress with the ditching operation around the V6-V7 stage of corn.  Every area where the plots are being placed was strip tilled in 3 days due to a couple technical difficulties, who doesn’t have those first time out with a brand new tractor?

Fig 2:  April 2021 Demo Tractor and Orthman-Deere DR planter planting soybeans at High Plains Vo-Ag plots near Polk, Nebraska Tractor and Planter courtesy of AKRS John Deere

Week of April 29, 2021  The first seeds were planted on the 28th then planting resumed on the 29th with beans and corn finished about sundown.

Our work is sorted out with studies in the soybeans:
1.  Five varieties of Plenish soybeans of 16 rows each by 325 ft long  (to observe how Plenish oil variety soybeans do in a strip till environment)
2.  Use of a MaxEmerge high speed planter compared to a ME5 Deere planter to evaluate seed spacing – 32 rows each 2300ft length of run are the plots.  Singulation at various seed population has become a concern for Seed suppliers and growers as prices have increased and lower populations are becoming a concept to consider for yield and economic reasons.
3.  16 rows – No pre-plant fertility only starter. To evaluate and compare soybean response to starter plus pre-plant fertility.  Plot is 16 rows by 325 ft.
4.  We will be doing some drone helicopter work with foliar applications later in the summer vs a sidedress application of nutrients and carbon (sugar) products.

Figure 3:  Time stakes of when emergence did occur in a Pioneer emergence study with one particular hybrid at the McNaught Farm

In Figure three, after planting the local Pioneer group came out every day 12 hrs apart and conducted an emergence study in corn and marked each plant that emerged over  period of time.  Once all the data is compiled we will give a synopis of the study.

More to come coming in the days and weeks ahead ………..

 

Week of May 24-28, 2021

Mick, Pat and I carried out more compaction measurements with a new research tool from Spectrum Technologies, SC-900 Data recording Penetrometer.  These plots are associated with AKRS John Deere to determine differences in how soil is conditioned with rubber tired MFWDA tractor versus the new Deere 8RX tractor.  We have completed measurements vertically to the 14 inch depth across 16 rows to understand how 24 inch wide tracks differ from a dualed wheel tractor.  This week (June 1-4) we are gaining the last measurements with the penetrometer then plant details also.   Look down this page and to the left, Mick is pushing the penetrometer into the soil in Figure 4.  This instrument Mick is using provides us measurements every inch to a depth of 15 inches.  We are looking in a 30 inch row system in the existing planted row where the srip till unit was pulled, then 6-7″ onto the shoulder of the strip till zone, then 6-7″ into the row center then onto the next edge and on into the planted/strip tilled row and so on across 16 rows.

We then will use Microsoft Excel to graph the 3-D look of the 1 inch depth increments to see where compaction may still be or where the tire impression left sign of its passing this spring compared to what the strip till tool accomplished.  It is our hope to also take the data and produce some other 2-D maps of how the soil looks after each of the tractors passed pulling the planter. We will have those available after John Deere sees and approves them for release as soon as we can.

The whispered message so far is that the track machine is developing less compaction than the rubber tire machine and at different depths.  Keep tuned right here to PrecisionTillage.com!

Fig. 4:  Agronomist, Mick Goedeken pressing recording Spectrum Technology penetrometer in the row to measure soil resistance at proper moisture content.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Updates:   July-August 2021……. Using the best in Technology to Produce

Making big efforts to apply fungicide and insecticide with best, modern tools available and to apply an ‘exact’ amount of products, we employed a Northeastern Nebraska growers 8 prop Drone-Copter to apply products at the R2 stage of corn and R4 stage of soybeans.  In this image the drone is returning to base to be refueled with product in it’s 3 gallon tank.  The drone sprays a 20ft swath which covers our 8 row speciality plots that are replicated on the farm near Polk, Nebraska.

In the last few years (2014-2020) Mick and I have seen late applications of fungicides, micronutrients and insecticides when warranted have given very positive returns on investment of the product and services to get the material on the crop.

Last year we applied via fixed wing aircraft nutrients and fungicide and saw in the grain wagon a return of $11 to $13 per acre (after expenses).  This year we are seeing in the soybeans more branching and pod set in comparison to where no products applied by 3 to 4 more branches which accounts for 12-25 more pods, and the rest of August is yet to finish out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Updating everyone the 2021 Orthman-South African New Strip Till Maize Research is harvested       July 13, 2021

Orthman – South Africa Field Research Efforts
Lead – Brian Niewoudt, Sales Manager for Orthman SA
Agronomist – Michael Petersen

 

For the 2021 crop growing season our corn efforts are transported to the terminal and sold.  Our farming cooperator has worked alongside Brian to establish repetitive plots and they finished the last plot in the dark.  Using the well known Orthman 1tRIPr, Brian organized with a demonstration 1tRIPr a set of plots placing dry fertilizer blend of local blend called 3-0-1 at differing depths of 250mm – 180mm – 110mm (9.8 inches – 7.1 inches – 4.3 inches).  These are plots 8 rows wide on 76cm spacing (30 inch) are replicated twice along with multiple checks.  Rate will be 120kg/hectare (just under 110lbs/acre) at those depths.

July harvest of the Orthman South Africa plots

We checked some growth parameters as the growing season progresses then harvested with a CNH combine.  Brian provided us on this website pictures so we stay abreast of the progress.   It is exciting to see the Orthman brand working with South Africa growers to provide the real benefits of the Orthman Strip Till technology.  Brian and the grower are expecting good results as long as the clouds do not dry up and go away.

The image on the left is from the field where the plots are being established.

This kind of field effort is quite new in the area where Brian and other Orthman South Africa staff are working to get SA growers introduced to the system we at Orthman call the Three Basic Principles of Strip Till.  Back in the United States we now have the results.  Brian and his grower want to show to others across South Africa how the Strip Till system with dry products can work and aid production as well as be economically vibrant and next year expand the project.

Dryland ears samples at random from the Maize Trials 2021

July harvested plots Yield……….

At the 250mm depth-162bu/ac;
At the 180mm depth- 168bu/ac and the
At the110mm depth- 152bu/ac yield.

Converting those figures from the research plots to international scale:

In tonnes/ha – 250mm depth-10.9T/ha,
Tonnes/ha — 180mm depth-11.3T/ha
Tonnes/ha — 110mm depth-10.2T/ha yields.

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Ohio State University- Columbus, Ohio   Update August 2nd, 2021

Now into the sixth year of cooperative efforts with the OSU Ag and Bioengineering team under the leadership of Dr. John Fulton; Orthman Mfg. is working together to study and educate the Ohio growers recent advances in Strip Till technology for row crop farming.  Ohio State University – Molly Caren Research Farm, Nate Douridas farm manager  

Ohio State Univ – Studying row-by-row compaction, fertilizer placement, Planter ride with Strip Till vs No-Till vs Conventional Till

Dr. John Fulton is heading up the OSU Ag Bioengineering departments efforts to study density of soils, planter ride characteristics, downforce on planters with the strip till approach vs the No-Till approach for part of their efforts.  They are looking at the efficiency of phosphorus and potassium dry fertility placement programs with strip tillage compared to surface broadcast in response to the Lake Erie concerns from the Sandusky and Maumee River drainages.  The message coming from the State of Ohio, “The Ohio State University” is –  deep placement as a best management practice across 20 something number of counties that have waters draining to the Lake in the state.

In conjunction with the H2O Ohio State funded program to aid growers across the northern region of Ohio to lower the phosphate contributions to Lake Erie, OSU will be putting research efforts with how growers utilize Strip-Till and in-soil placement of fertility.  This year in the Defiance area of the state some cooperative research is being carried out to determine the effectiveness of best management practices placing P&K.

The University has developed an outreach program through their eFields Reports (Digital Ag Program) that are printed every year in late December and January.  They are determined to bring the best science and technology to the Ohio State farm system that Cooperative Extension Service has around the state.  Orthman and Salford teamed up with OSU to provide state-of-the-art equipment, accuracy of dry nutrients, best conservation tillage management with a great outreach program.

The scientists have used the 1tRIPr in the spring prior to planting and also early fall operations to demonstrate as well as figure out which approach works well in the Ohio environment.  People to contact at OSU: Dr. John Fulton or Nate Douridas-Farm Manager at Molly Caren site, near London, OH.

Gov. DeWine Announces $5M for Ohio River Basin Wetland Projects

Ohio Governor Mike DeWine announced today that $5 million in grants is now available for local wetland projects aimed at improving water quality in the Ohio River Basin. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is administering the Ohio River Basin H2Ohio..

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) is administering the Ohio River Basin H2Ohio Wetland Grant Program as part of Governor DeWine’s H2Ohio initiative. The program is funded as part of Ohio’s 2022-2023 budget which the Ohio General Assembly passed and Governor DeWine signed earlier this summer.

“Many new and restored H2Ohio wetlands are already working to reduce algal blooms on Lake Erie, and we’re excited to continue expanding wetlands projects into other parts of the state,” said Governor DeWine. “Everyone deserves clean water, and by targeting this grant funding to the Ohio River Basin, it will help ensure that communities here have the opportunity to invest in wetland projects to naturally improve water quality for future generations.”

Wetlands help improve water quality by trapping, filtering, and removing excess pollutants and nutrients, such as phosphorus, from the water before they flow into waterways and contribute to harmful algal blooms. Right now, there are nearly 60 H2Ohio wetland projects underway or complete.

“We’ve seen such success in such a short time with our wetland projects, especially in northwest Ohio,” said ODNR Director Mary Mertz. “Opportunities to address nutrient pollution and related water quality problems in Ohio are not limited to one part of the state. We know that the wetland work we are doing can help us address these challenges. We are really excited to add to the growing list of H2Ohio wetlands and share the benefits of these projects with everyone in Ohio.”

The Ohio River Basin H2Ohio Wetland Grant Program is a competitive, reimbursement grant program that provides up to $500,000 per project for wetland projects that address nutrient loading and contribute to water quality improvement. Eligible projects include wetland creation, wetland restoration on hydric soils, and existing wetland and floodplain water quality enhancements.

A full list of criteria and program priorities can be found at odnr.gov. The deadline to apply is September 30, 2021.

H2Ohio is Governor Mike DeWine’s initiative to ensure safe and clean water in Ohio. It is a comprehensive, data-driven approach to improving water quality over the long-term. H2Ohio focuses on encouraging agricultural best management practices, restoring and enhancing wetlands, and replacing home septic systems to reduce nutrients that contribute to harmful algal blooms

 

 

 

 

 

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Stiles Farm Foundation – Texas A&M      Williamson County, Texas

Going into the 12th season [starting back in 2008] of working cooperatively with the staff and leadership at the 501.3(c) farm near Thrall, Texas; we are seeing under the direction of Ryan Collett farm manager work to accomplish efforts in demonstrating Strip Till in the Brazos River area where full width tillage is the primary method to raise row crops such as corn, cotton and grain sorghum.  The work that is in play for the 2020 season with the Orthman 6row 1tRIPr is incorporating fertilizer placement of N-P-K prior to planting, and also after a small grain crop (wheat) then planting sesame in 30 inch rows for crop alternatives.

Location of the Stiles Farm and Orthman sponsored

Strip Till offers advantages to the Texas farmer in the way of fuel savings, water erosion protection with spring and summer high intensity rainfall events, placement of nutrients, fertilizer efficiency, reduction of water erosion and fertilizer losses, alleviating soil compaction in the high clay content soils and helping water intake.

Each early summer the Stiles Farm puts together a great informational day showing what is happening with on-going research from Texas A&M and other efforts like ours right on the farm

Some Progress to Report:     November 16, 2020

After a discussion with Ryan we have some results and also ideas of where the Stiles Farm is heading with 360-370 acres of fall strip tilling done with the Orthman 1tRIPr for the 2021 season.  In the very heavy clayey soils of the farm, fall tillage has been a proven method to ready their fields. Ryan expressed to us that they are planning on corn, grain sorghum and a smaller percentage of those 360+ acres go into cotton for 2021.  The fertilizer program is in laid down to feed the upcoming crops.  He did share that a portion of the fertility program went on with the strip till tool.

What happened in 2020?  The Stiles Farm had field plots where strip till was compared to more conventional tillage in corn.  This year like so many of you felt and went through was very dry, lots of sunlight and the yields in rainfed agriculture were dinged.  Strip till averaged 75-82bpa (5.1T/ha – 5.5T/ha) and the disk-chisel system which dried out after a damp start and allowed planting two weeks earlier was yielding 90-110bpa (6.1T/ha – 7.4T/ha). With a season like so many had in 2020, that planting date made a difference in so many row crops.   Ryan is not deterred, his actions and motivation is to go forward with a head of steam in 2021.

Another trial Ryan is working into the farms operation is interjecting cover crops with the strip till system.  The Stiles Farm also has a cow-calf operation and grazing of cover crops provides a great feed resource for them.  Ryan is going ahead with some cover mixes to be grazed and then south of US-79 on that part of the farm strip till and grow corn.  Yes that all is dependent upon winter and early spring moisture.  Ryan said for the Texas grower in this part of the country, “stop by and visit with us at Stiles and we be open to sharing what is up for 2021.”

We will keep you informed of what Ryan and Texas A&M is accomplishing.  With Ryan getting the old four row-40 inch 1tRIPr updated to a 6row-40 inch in late winter of 2019-20 and some adaptations to the toolbar for liquid fertility finished  he continues to go for more strip tillage acres and demonstrate to growers the ability of Strip Till technology to be viable in South Central Texas.

Contact Ryan Collett at the Stiles Farm  512.898.2214  or Orthman’s Territory Tech and Sales Manager – Justin Cross 806.500.0847  they will be glad to visit and assist with your questions.

 

Stay tuned to on-going developments, events at the Stiles Foundation Farm.

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Agro-Liquid Fertilizers) – St. Johns, MI         Report as of June 10th, 2021

 

Spring Strip Tilling this year-2020 and placing nutrients at AgroLiquid farm near St.Johns, MI

Tim Duckert our agronomy buddy up at AgroLiquid headquarters has just reported the 2021 season is off to a flying start.  The 1tRIPr they have on the 1000 acre research set of farms has had a good amount of work done.  He said it went like a dream.

“Temperatures warmed up early in the spring,” Tim commented, ” and we (AgroLiquid) got with the fervor of the great spring into excellent field conditions with what the 1tRIPr provided us with fall work. Since we had not received any pounding rains the field conditions were just right.  I cannot express how much this 1tRIPr strip tillage pass last fall made planting gowell and provided a nice mellow seedbed with excellent moisture retention during our dry spring. Many people used full width tillage and once they opened up the ground it dried out real fast and they had some emergence problems. But we have some excelent stands in the fall strips.”

What has become reality as research this year for AgroLiquid:

1.  In the FFA Challenge plots about half of them became strip till with the 1tRIPr for their studies – other half either No-Till or vertical Tillage – both corn and soybeans are planted

2.  In the FFA Challenge plots which are highlighted at AgExpo the week of August 18th they look at: emergence, stand, vigor, fertility analyses, economics, and yield

3.  Spring Strip Till includes tillage and subsequent sulfur application in soybeans

The AgExpo is a two day educational event to expose a myriad of research efforts.   They are offering outdoor learning classroom and  field studies to Michigan V0-Ag departments and students.  This is August 17-18th, 2021.

Images below are from the spring work completed for the FFA Challenge plots with the Orthman 1tRIPr.

 

 

 

Contact Burt Henry: office: 989.227.3887  He is the Industrial and Relations Leader with AgroLiquid.

 

2021 FFA Challenge Soybean Plot with Pre-Plant 1tRIPr as Tillage Pass

FFA Challenge Corn Plot with use of Orthman 1tRIPr

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stay Tuned to new on-going developments at the St. Johns, MI site:

August 17-18, 2021  AgroLiquid is continuing to plan the summer AgExpo.  The Vo-Ag students are eager to articulate what they have done this year and their progress with the AgroLiquids team of scientists.  COME AND SEE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cooperative Efforts with Central Valley Cooperative in 5 locations (Nebraska, Kansas and Iowa)   Update July 29th, 2021

   READ BELOW THE 2020 RESULTS FROM THREE OF THE FIVE SITES THAT THE CVA ADVANCED CROPPING SYSTEMS TEAM CARRIED OUT…..

Orthman 4row research designated 1tRIPr with new Montag smaller poly tank precision dry tank system. Plots being done this spring at Polk, NE.

   

In a cooperative atmosphere, Orthman and Pat McNaught, Mick Goedeken (the new man wearing the Agronomy hat alongside Mike Petersen with CVA Coop are going to carry out some field research at 5 sites; Cuba, KS, Polk, NE, Western Iowa, and Norfolk, NE plus an organic farm comparison of using pelletized chicken manure versus  broadcast at Marquette, NE. We will be co-studying placement of P&K&S nutrients (dry products using what is commonly called 40Rock).   The CVA field Agronomist is making a 2year study continue on so as to compare this 12-40-0-18 dry fertilizer with broadcast operations of MAP or 11-52-0 + dry urea on No-Till.  The dry products were placed at 6.5 inches below the soil surface.  This is the second year of carrying out research efforts with this Cooperative.  We look forward to seeing and reporting what data is captured and how the products compare which they offer at their facilities across the 3 states.

Montag is offering of a dry distribution dual poly tank system (see the image to the left), hydraulic drive and metering system which mounts and dismounts on the 4row 1tRIPr demo unit Pat has to showcase the Strip-Till system with their new smaller dry system.  CVA reports that spring strip till went smoothly, rain showed up once at the wrong time about time they planted but all signs are full speed ahead.

CVA is planning on 1 field day in late summer per site which we are asked to be part of those events

Stay Tuned for follow-ups with CVA field efforts and data right here:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Colorado State University and USDA- Agricultural Research Service – AEC-ARDEC Farms near Fort Collins, CO
Updated February 12, 2021

 

Comparison tillage trials with moldboard system and Strip-Till at Stroh Farm (Courtesy: Colorado State Univ.)

At the multiple research farms all part of ARDEC north of Ft. Collins, Colorado are the Stroh and Bee Farms where on-going strip till research with a 6row 1tRIPr tool is being carried out by several research scientists, along with my efforts with Orthman Manufacturing and technicians that was started in 2011.  It has been steadily plugging along looking at water quality, irrigation induced irrigation erosion, and now Soil Health benefits.  Not only in the past but present day,  tillage system technology with Strip-Till compared to the plow-disk system, and a modified version of No-Till; other research is looking at nutrient placement for yield enhancement on furrow irrigated fields as well as overhead sprinkler irrigation.  Activities to observe water efficiency, water savings (up to 2 fewer irrigation passes) with ditch water and row-to-row irrigation, using less fertilizer, nitrogen reduction, residue management for wind and water erosion protection, and nutrient product selections.  These studies are carried out in corn on corn, corn following small grain or sugar beets and or dry edible beans.

CSU teamed alongside ARS have designated field events for the public during specific times during the growing season at the Stroh Farm headquarters north of Ft. Collins just off I-25 and south of Wellington, CO.  Studies have been going on the farm since 2011.  The unit is owned by USDA-ARS.

 

 

 

 

 

References and Published Documentation throughout this 10 year on going program

First, Colorado State Ag Experiment Station Bulletin was released in 2015, TR-15-10.  Authors Erik Wardle, Troy Bauder and Calvin Person.  It can be found online through the Ag Experiment Station.  Then in September 2020 in Soil Science Society of America Journal, E. DeLeon et al. under a grant from USDA-NRCS published their findings in the SSSA Journal.  Correspondence author is Steven.Fonte@Colostate.edu if you would like the full article.  Title: Conservation tillage supports soil macrofauna communities, infiltration, and farm profits in an irrigated maize-based cropping system of Colorado.

 

Mr. Fonte and co-authors wrote that they felt conservation tillage under furrow irrigation can have notable impacts not only on the farming system profit margins but both soil physical properties and soil biology.  During the two year study what they observed was some significant improvements in soil macrofauna communities in the Strip till compared to the Plow-pack system largely driven by the earthworm population shift.  Under the Strip Tillage portion of the study earthworms most likely benefit from the food source, cooler soil temperatures longer into the growing season so they will move upwards to feed which enriches the soil with stable soil aggregates and fresh residues (carbon materials).  In the conventional plow tillage the earthworm burrows are truncated, those worms that were shallow at time of the plow are cut into pieces and they are smothered.  Another benefit in the way of dollars and cents; due to fewer trips across the field the savings were in the fixed and variable costs of the Strip Tillage system compared to conventional full width tillage with multiple passes.  Table below shows the analysis over the two year period.

TABLE 1:   Two-year average yields and enterprise budget for Conventional (CT), Minimum (MT), Strip (ST) tillage treatments in a field-scale tillage trial near Fort Collins, Colorado. Means within the same year followed by different letters are significantly different (P < 0.05)

CSU Study showing increased soil moisture storage in early season corn stand with Strip Till
Courtesy: Dr. Phil Westra

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Both of the published documents reflect that CSU Extension Service is moving to study and inform that Conservation Tillage has a place in irrigated agriculture, economics are proving to be beneficial, and now Soil Health is being improved with Strip Till.  The researchers I spoke to this week (February 11, 2021) are delving deeper into the Soil Health aspect, especially in the Microbiology scene.  We ask you to stay tuned of the on-going work Colorado State University is doing as well the part we at Orthman Manufacturing do to support and add agronomic value to their good work.

 

 

 

 

 

ATLANTIC COASTAL REGION — North Carolina State University
Beaufort County   June 2021 Update

 

Rod Gurganus our associate contact with NCSU Extension has contacted us to bring us all information on what is happening in the SE part of the United States.
He stated that weather worked in the favor of what they are trying to do with planting and getting crops in for the 2021 season.  He got one full trial planted behind the 1tRIPr due to mechanical details and the arrival of a tractor.  This year the farm is testing N directly under the row at 6 inches deep before they plant and compare that to broadcast.  Within this approach they are studying different ratios of at-planting vs lay-by nitrogen application.  Pictures of the progress are coming and we will update.

   Rod Gurganus – NCSU Researcher is our contact

NCSU Research Farm – Northeastern Station

 

 

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University of Minnesota

 

May 2020 1tRIPr strips being made in Clover cover crop

Southern Research Center for UMN

In 2020 Orthman has teamed up to cooperate with the Universities 4 row 1tRIPr to conduct research on how well strip till works into live clover cover crops.  On the left is an image from May 12th, 2020 field activities into the rapidly growing clover cover crop.

Studies will include growing corn to see how the cover crop can offer benefits to growth, soil health and potential yield.  Scientists are studying the planting efficacy or lack of with corn.  They are looking at how a clover cover can be a sustainable “partner” crop as the corn grows.  They will be checking soil microbial life, gases exchange and soil organic matter accumulation.  The studies include what addition of N will be provided to the growing corn crop within this strip till environment.

This study is at the U. of Minnesota Ag Experiment Station farm south of the Twin Cities, our contact is Jonathan Alexander, graduate student.   Doug Peterson is the Orthman Territory Manager of the Minnesota-Iowa-Western Wisconsin -Nebraska region.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Follow along for updates with the Corn-into-Cover Crop project:

 

 

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